eTextile DIY treasure chest – Plug and Wear

Riccardo Marchesi started around a year ago the online shop Plug and Wear to provide the eTextile community with a one-stop-shop offering eTextile designer a large selection of materials for wearable electronic projects. The relative new area of wearable electronic with it’s specific eTextile components does not yet have a structure of well established resources,…

DIY – Bi-Directional Flex Sensor

Flex sensors are a often used elements in eTextile projects as they give indication of movement or pressure events in interactive wearable electronic objects. Plusea has made a large range of stretch and pressure sensors using neoprene and conductive yarn as the key elements. Instructable member jiovine made a Bi-Directional Flex Sensor using copper foil…

DIY – Weight sensing Tote Bag

Instructables member markaleung made one of those sensible wearable electronic concepts I love for their simplicity and sensibility in regard to the functionality offered: the Weight sensing Tote Bag. Knowing the weight of a bag, especially when flying somewhere can be a question of how much money we have to shell out when in front…

DIY – stylish eTextile embroidery

The fabulous eTextile DIY site ‘How to get what you want‘ from  Mika Satomi and Hannah Perner-Wilson keeps on adding frequently new material for every eTextile enthusiast to learn and to get inspired. I love the recently posted embroidered potentiometers as they show nicely how to integrate technical parts such as conductive lines which can…

Interested in conductive yarn?

Getting conductive yarn in small quantities is sometimes difficult as manufacturer usually think big and are not set up in their logistics to serve individual customers with small quantities. Hannah Perner-Wilson over at ‘How to get what you want‘ is able to make a deal with one of these big manufacturers – Schoeller – and…

DIY – sensible eTextiles

The countless variations of textile/knit/crochet sensors Hannah Perner-Wilson aka Plusea created provide a valuable toolbox and source of inspiration for the eTextile community. Her recent focus on pressure and stretch/bend sensors made by knitting and crocheting offer a unique alternative to conductive stretch fabric sensors. Although it is sometimes challenging to find conductive yarn and…

DIY eTextile projects from Kobakant

Kobakant, the joined DIY Wearable Technology Documentation project from Hannah Perner-Wilson and Mika Satomi keeps adding interesting must-read information for anyone interested into eTextile technology and design. It’s one of my habits to check out this site on a regular basis (it’s easy via a news reader) to make sure I do not miss any…

Crochet, the new DIT eTextile technique

The team at ‘How to Get What You Want‘ published recently eTextile sensors (pressure and tilt sensor) which a made of conductive wool using the Crochet technique to build electrically conductive traces and patches into Crochet work. Besides weaving and knitting, crochet is a excellent way to incorporate electrically conductive elements into fabrics totally seamless,…

eTextile DIY – Sensitive Fingertips

It must have been a busy time lately for Instructables member Pulsea aka Hannah Perner-Wilson who was heavily involved into the creation and launch of ‘How to get what you want‘ a excellent resource for eTextile enthusiasts and now she published one of her fabulous textile sensor works on Instructables called: ‘Sensitive Fingertips‘ The ‘Sensitive…

e_Static Shadows – textile display visualizes electro static

‘e-Static Shadows‘ is a research project by designer Dr. Zane Berzina and architect Jackson Tan which creatively explores the speculative and poetic potential of static electricity found in our everyday environments, surrounding our everyday interactions. The aim of the project is to investigate how electrostatic energy could either be effectively utilized or play a part…

eTextile DIY – Proximity Sensing Fabric

This weeks eTextile DIY project introduction comes from Adrian Freed, Research Director at CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technology) who is by the way organizing the Interactive e-textile Workshop with Arduino LilyPad (still some places left for the August session). The Proximity Sensing Fabric project is demonstrating how interactive fashion designer could recreate…

The Digital world at your fingertips

Plusea aka Hannah Perner-Wilson is one of the most active wearable technologists judging on the amount of her DIY instructions especially around textile sensors and interactive clothing for performing artists. Her most recent creation posted on YouTube is the ‘Sensitive Fingertips‘ (see embedded video below) a glove containing pressure sensors on each finger tip allowing…

e-textile DIY – Sensing Bracelet

Plusea has added another of her highly inspirational and very detailed e-textile  instructions to her ever growing Instructables library, the ‘Time Sensing Bracelet‘ The Time Sensing Bracelet is a circular fabric potentiometer where a fictive time can be set by making contact in the corresponding position. Plusea points out ‘There is no point to it…

e-textile DIY – pressure sensor matrix

Hyper active e-textile DIY instruction creator Hannah Perner-Wilson aka Intructables user Plusea posted another simple to follow but highly interesting and useful project, the Pressure Sensor Matrix. As her many other e-textile DIY instructions, the materials used are relatively easy to get, in this project an Arduino is needed to process the signals coming from…

DIY e-textiles – Knit touchpad

Plusea (Hannah Perner-Wilson) added a new e-textile component to her DIY wearable electronic component portfolio, a Knit Touchpad. The idea of the Knit Touchpad is to replicate a textile based input similar as the one we use on our notebooks. The advantage of a textile touchpad is: it can be part of a garment or…