switching-memory-for-e_textiles

The Gigabyte Shirt

Imagine our clothing, any type of clothing from under to outer-wear is acting as digital data storage memory. Sound too far fetched? Actually NASA scientists found a way to do just that – transforming fabrics into huge storage arrays potentially transforming a simple shirt into a Giga or even Terra Byte storage medium. The underlying…

wearable-power-fabric

Electrifying Fabrics

Wearable power is on the top of my search list and each time I stumble across news out of the research kitchen I can not help but to share the latest news. Undeniable, wearable power, using materials that act and look like ordinary fabric that either generates or stores electrical energy will ultimately be THE…

Cotton-transistor

Cotton Transistors

Mastering a truly seamless integration of electronic functionality into fabrics remains a challenge up to this day. Most experiments and design concepts use hybrid solutions ranging form detachable, add-on wearable electronic functionality to semi integrated solutions where part of the electronic elements are fully integrated into the fabric of clothing while part of the function…

Stretchable Electronic Skin

A team of Nokia researchers working at Cambridge working on a morphing, stretchable face of next generation phones but this technology is also highly interesting for wearable electronic, to integrate complex electronic functionality into our second skin = our clothing. The researchers work on projects such as Nanowire Sensing, Stretchable Electronic Skin and Electro-tactile Experience…

Translator shirt

Visionaries at Bayer, a German high tech company directed their research power on photovoltaic according to a recently published press release. The for us noticeable statement can be found towards the end of the press release stating ‘In future, photovoltaic applications could extend far beyond traditional solar modules. One such application could be a “translator…

Wearable Power – the body as power station

Next to interactive gloves, wearable power is coming into the news on a regular, frequent basis. The latest news I picked up is based on research work at the University of Southampton where scientists aim to generate energy through people’s movement. In theory human motion generates an estimated 67 watts of energy with each step….

Graphene OPV – wearable sun-power within reach?

Professor Chongwu Zhou and his team of researcher at the University of Southern California produced flexible transparent carbon atom films that have great potential for a new breed of solar cells suitable to be integrated into garments. Graphene OPV (organic photovoltaics) has been on the research agenda for a couple of years as means to…

Smart Textiles: Weaving with electronics

Most wearable electronic development we see today are made by attaching either permanently or removable electronic functionality. This concept has it’s usefulness in some areas but the ultimate break through in wearable electronic will be by fully integrating electronics into fabrics from which clothing is made. Fabrics are made by weaving yarns of different types…

Electronic Fiber

Staying a bit in the fiber since field today’s article is about a development coming from Jian Feng Gu at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China. Mr. Jian Feng Gu and his team work on a simple rolled capacitor from a sheet of conducting polymer sandwiched between two insulating sheets of low…

Textile science: Fibers that can hear and sing

In the old days making fibers was a relative simple matter, creating yarn and weave them to clothes. But these days are numbered with the emergence of intelligent fibers and textiles. Fiber development migrated in our digital age to electronic laboratories like MIT’s Research Lab of Electronics where Associate professor of Materials Science, Yoel Fink…

Wearable Power – Paper Battery

Assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford Yi Cui and his team have manufactured a new energy storage device (battery) out of ordinary paper or cloth coated with carbon nanotube ink. Sounds fantastic news for wearable power especially as this process can be made cheaply and efficiently manufactured into lightweight paper or textile…

Implantable Electronics

A topic that goes one step further than Wearable Electronic: Implantable Electronic. Wearable of course but this new field of electronics g=does not stop on the skin, it goes under the skin. For me, implantable electronic is as fascinating as wearable electronic as both aim to use cutting edge technologies to improve life quality. Wearable…

Fiber Nanogenerators power up our future clothing

On a fairly regular basis researchers publish new findings around power generating textiles, a topic highly interesting for the wearable electronic community. This time engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, created energy generating nanofibers that could one day be woven into textiles. The nano-sized generators work on the ‘piezoelectric’ principle, converting kinetic energy through…

Wafer-thin plastic stores electricity

A recently published scientific development from researcher at the Imperial College London looks like another stepping stone towards wearable power. The scientists created a super-capacitor in a flexible form by sandwiching a glass-fiber layer between two layers of carbon fibers which are covered with electricity conducting resign. Super-capacitor, widely used in electronic products, have the…

Conductive Energy Textiles

Scientists at Stanford University, CA join the race for wearable power by developing ink from single-walled carbon nanotubes. According to the scientists, everyday textiles like Cotton or Polyester fabrics can be electrified with an extremely simple “dipping and drying” process resulting in eTextiles with an excellent ability to store electricity. Conductive ink impregnated textiles retain…

Body Electronics

Wearable electronic is still in it’s early stage, make the first baby steps into the harsh world of commercialization but visionaries and researchers work already on the next big thing in getting electronics closer to our bodies, actually inside our bodies. Having electronic implants is not new and some people depend their life on it…

Wearable Power – battery made from from algae cellulose

Soft, flexible, wearable power is the stuff many scientist are working on, not only for the wearable electronic community as many other applications like to use bendable, sustainable, power providing sources for our devices on the go. A group of scientist at the Uppsala University in Sweden led by scientist Albert Mihranyan try to develop…

Visionary clothing

We have covered many times the advantage wearable technologies can bring to us and our clothing by using it’s potential for sensor inclusion as a second skin, extending our sensory ability. A resent development by a team of researchers at MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering led by Associate Professor Yoel Fink could add…

iLED – the next wearable display

While OLEDs are the hype of today when it comes to flexible, bright and colorful displays able to be integrated into clothing, a team of scientist is already working on the next big technology which could change the rule of the wearable display game. OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes) offer faster refresh rates and brighter colors…

The future of wearable power – printable batteries?

Wearable power, one of the hottest researched topics in the wearable electronic field got another boost from researchers at the Fraunhofer Research Institution for Electronic Nano Systems EANS together with colleagues from TU Chemnitz and Menippos GmbH. The research team led by Prof. Dr. Reinhard Baumann developed batteries that can be printed using a silk-screen…

Wearable electronic science – flexible electronics

Transforming silicon based, rigid electronic components into soft, flexible elements is one of the corner stones on the way to more complex wearable electronic technology. Currently e-textile components circling around passive – electronically speaking – components like conductive yarns for data and power transmission through clothing, electrically conductive fabric for sensors and switches or used…

Wearable Electronic science – printed power

Wearable power, a highly researched topic for wearable electronics and many other application field got another faced: supercapacitors made up of a gel electrolyte sandwiched between two carbon-nanotube electrodes, could be created by using existing ink-jet printing methods. Capacitors and batteries both store electrical energy with the difference that capacitors provide rapid bursts of power…

Wearable Electronic science – Nanofication of textiles

At times, nano-whatever seems to solve all problems the world is suffering from. Nano has the sound of a ‘magic spell’ on it. No wonder that ‘nanofication’ of textiles was one of the first areas nano technology found early commercial applications. One of the most prominent nano-textile applications is the impregnation (coating) of fibers and…

Wearable Electronic science – hardware made soft

Traditional electronic components are stiff and rigid which makes them not only ‘unwearable’ when integrated into textile but also ‘unusable’ as those components will be damaged when bended. Much efforts are spend into softening traditional hardware to allow smart electronics enter new application areas to improve our life and lifestyle. e-Textile technologies usually start out…

Wearable Electronic Science

Researcher from the Interuniversity Microelectronics Centre (IMEC) in Belgium and its associated laboratory at Ghent University presented this week during the Smart Systems Integration Conference in Brussels their newly developed UTCP (ultra-thin chip package) technology which can be seen as a big boost towards fully integrated, complex electronic into textiles. UTCP allows the integration of…

Leah Buechley – democratization of technology

Leah Buechley one of the leading personalities in the DIY wearable electronic field and creator of the unique LilyPad e-textile platform as well as countless DIY instructions to create ‘soft electronics’ gave recently a talk outlining her new task at MIT where she is heading the High-Low Tech Group. Expanding on her great work in…

Science – Tactile display technology

A team of scientist at the Technical University in Dresden / Germany has demonstrated a new display technology that adds to the visible information representation the tactile dimension. The display is formed of hydro gel droplets the size of 0.3 millimeter packing 297 ‘pixels’ onto just one square centimeter, a pretty high resolution. Hydro gels…