Fingual – finger language translator glove

Talking with hands often refers to people who spice up their spoken words with generous gestures to hammer out the point they like to make.

Talking with hands is first and foremost a important communication form for people who unfortunately lost their hearing capability. There are other hand communication forms like people who spice up their spoken words with generous gestures to hammer out the point they like to make.

Interesting for both groups but most useful for the first one is a new developments made by a group from Osaka University and Shinshu University, a finger-language interface called Fingual.

The Fingual functions very much  like a microphone connected to a computer with the difference this it translates finger gestures into characters which are then fed into a text program.

The magic of gesture to written word transformation is made possible by magnets on the tip of each finger. A magnetic sensor measures the changes of the magnetic field as the fingers form different characters.

Each character formed be the fingers generates it’s distinctive magnetic field which is then matched with the set of magnetic data to character table – a simple yet genius principle. No huge processing power, finger tracking or the like.

A Photo-reflector on the glove produces a infrared light signal that transmits the finger signs to a computers text editor.

Spicing up gloves is one of the hottest congested items in the wearable technology arena. Concept studies and developments like the Fingual pointing towards meaningful and useful applications of soft, wearable tech.

[DigInfo via Ubergizmo]

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