HandTalk – interactive communication glove

HandTalk_glove.jpgYou might know the term ‘talk to my hand’ used in situations like “you’d be as well talk to my hand ‘cos I ain’t gonna listen to you anyway“.

A group of engineering students at Carnegie Mellon University gave this term a twist and created a hand that talks.

The students Bhargav Bhat, Hemant Sikaria, Jorge L. Meza and Wesley Jin demonstrated their project ‘HandTalk‘ a sensor equipped glove that translates finger and hand gestures into spoken words.

The motivation for this concept is to enable the communication between deaf persons and persons that do not have knowledge of the Sign language.

This is the first demonstrator model to show the functionality based on a limited vocabulary of 32 words which is not bad for a version number of v0.1

The HandTalk works like this: sensors in the glove pick up gestures and transmit the data wirelessly via Bluetooth to a cell phone which runs a Text to Speech software. The sensor data are converted first into text and then to voice output. A person not knowledgeable in Sign language can listen via the cell phone what the other person is saying in Sign language form.

I like the simplicity and the (very) cheap components these students used to create this amazing and truly interactive glove that could help to improve greatly the communication barrier between deaf persons and people not familiar with the Sign language.

A brilliant idea. Check out the excellent organized project documentation which is available online. A highly interesting and inspirational source of a wearable interactive glove.

[CMU via Post Gazette]



Related posts:
The Original Hand-Talk glove
Talk to my glove
Communication glove for deaf-blind persons


Posted in Category: Concept Design | 37 Comments »

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[...] It sounds great, but I think Jason Chen put it best when he asked: “I wonder what it’ll convert this gesture into:” [Pittsburg Post Gazette via talk2myshirt] [...]

[...] It sounds great, but I think Jason Chen put it best when he asked: “I wonder what it’ll convert this gesture into”: [Pittsburg Post Gazette via talk2myshirt] [...]

[...] It sounds great, but I think Jason Chen put it best when he asked: “I wonder what it’ll convert this gesture into”: [Pittsburg Post Gazette via talk2myshirt] [...]

[...] It sounds great, but I think Jason Chen put it best when he asked: “I wonder what it’ll convert this gesture into”: [Pittsburg Post Gazette via talk2myshirt] [...]

[...] It sounds great, but I think Jason Chen put it best when he asked: “I wonder what it’ll convert this gesture into”: [Pittsburg Post Gazette via talk2myshirt] [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

A guy named Ryan Patterson did this a few years ago as part of the Intel Competition.

http://www.intel.com/education/isef/profiles/match.htm

it is not the first time. we did it before.

[...] (via Talk2MyShirt) Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. [...]

[...] at Carnegie Mellon University have demoed their latest project, Handtalk, a sensor equipped glove that translates finger and hand gestures into speech. The device’s vocabulary is limited to just 32 words but I have to admit, I’m out of [...]

I’m disappointed. This seems like a direct ripoff of Ryan Patterson’s work back in 2001. My booth was right next to his at the Intel Science Fair. His prototype was much better and that was 7 years ago!

[...] via [talk2myshirt] [...]

Unfortunately, so much of communication done with Sign Language is not based on signing. Signs represent only about 20% to 25% of “the message”, the rest coming from facial expressions and body language, which would be missed by the glove. Great idea, but not useful in the real world.

[...] have posted a few days ago the story of the HandTalk communication glove from a team of students at Carnegie Mellon University that translates American Sign Language (ASL) [...]

[...] HandTalk HandTalk glove speaks your hand gestures… we can see where this is headed by Paul Miller, posted May 12th 2008 at 9:52AM Oooh, now we get it. HandTalk converts hand gestures like sign language into spoken words. Well, don’t we feel silly. The device was developed by a group of nerds at Carnegie Mellon, and can track finger and hand gestures with a vocabulary of 32 words in its existing v0.1 model. The signals are transmitted from the glove to a phone over Bluetooth, where the words are converted with text to speech software. Not bad for for a bunch of off-the-shelf components, but they could’ve scored double the nerd points by repurposing a Power Glove for this — gotta think big picture, people. [Via talk2myShirt] HandTalk – interactive communication glove – talk2myShirt [...]

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man…..this is such a good idea.i really wish to extend my ideas on it .so could you kind enough to mail me the specifications,details and everything[project report]of the project as soon as possible…..thanx alot…do reply….plzzzzzzzz..

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